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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
my stock intake elbow is bleaching excessively and having some chemical reaction where I can literally wipe white "dust" off of the inside and outside of the tube. its a white slightly yellow powder that comes off. in general it looks bleached or oxidized. my jeep is garaged but had sad on a lot when I got it and had a little of this going on but not this bad. dealer said don't worry, order a cai. so I did. however this one seems potentially bad for the engine with this dust, and is more than unsightly ESPECIALLY for something so new and expensive. what's everyone's experience with this? is there any proper way to remove it and treat it? should I make them warranty it? is it fine and am I a baby?:crying:
 

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It is completely normal and very common. I don't know why. I honestly have not checked the inside of mine yet, but the outside is just like you describe. Mine was built in Feb 18, and I purchased in May of 18, so it didn't sit long... only point being is that I don't think that matters. I'm at 4300 miles and it looks oxidized.
 

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Mine is doing the same, and with 6k miles now I have been just applying Mothers Back to Black to the outside of the tube. The white dust only comes off when it is rubbed so I am not worried about it getting sucked into the engine from the inside of the intake tube. I believe the discoloration is related engine heat. If I were you, I would have it replaced under warranty before you put a CAI on, otherwise the dealer may not be willing to correct the issue since you resolved it on your own. You can then store the replacement away should you ever need to put it back to stock for resale, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
thats the plan, hoping some guys will pop on here and confirm that they have had that part warranteed out by the dealer .
 

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bleached intake

I am in South Florida, mine bleached out quickly and was replaced under warranty. I put a picture up of that some time ago on this site. Now the replacement is doing the same. Think I will give up and install a CAI, but on this site, it is difficult to tell what one really is best, if there is much difference between different CAi's.
 

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I am in South Florida, mine bleached out quickly and was replaced under warranty. I put a picture up of that some time ago on this site. Now the replacement is doing the same. Think I will give up and install a CAI, but on this site, it is difficult to tell what one really is best, if there is much difference between different CAi's.
I hit mine with some tire dressing and so far looks good. Not sure about the inside of it though,Has anyone taken it off to check if inside turns white also?
 

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I hit mine with some tire dressing and so far looks good. Not sure about the inside of it though,Has anyone taken it off to check if inside turns white also?
According to OP bloodyhellhawk:

my stock intake elbow is bleaching excessively and having some chemical reaction where I can literally wipe white "dust" off of the inside and outside of the tube. its a white slightly yellow powder that comes off. in general it looks bleached or oxidized.
 

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I hit mine with some tire dressing and so far looks good. Not sure about the inside of it though,Has anyone taken it off to check if inside turns white also?
I got curious, so I pulled the intake and took a picture of outside and inside. My TH has 2231 miles on it. I did a finger drag to test and pull some of the dust and then just wiped the inside. I did notice something else that I want to talk to my service tech about.
 

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I got curious, so I pulled the intake and took a picture of outside and inside. My TH has 2231 miles on it. I did a finger drag to test and pull some of the dust and then just wiped the inside. I did notice something else that I want to talk to my service tech about.
Vaako, nice work. It sure looks nasty in there, I'm curious if that white stuff poses any threat for engine damage or problems.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I removed mine and cleaned the inside...not fun. will keep posted on results. dealer wouldn't warrantee it. and my livernois CAI is still in transit...
 

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My stock intake tube is doing it as well, inside and out. I cleaned the outside the first time and it came back pretty quickly. It seemed to happen right when the weather turned cold. I have since swapped to the Livernois intake so not worried anymore.
 

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The bleaching effect is actually caused by materials in the rubber blooming to the surface. Materials that cure the rubber, along with materials that are added to aid in oxidation and ozone resistance can bloom to the surface. The antioxidants and antiozonants are actually designed to migrate to the surface to create a barrier which protects the rubber components. The curative agents typically only bloom to the surface when their concentration is higher than the solubility point (poor formulation by the chemist). Heat can speed up the migration to the surface. Bottom line, there is nothing detrimental (with the exception of appearance) going on here. The same phenomenon can be seen in tire sidewalls. Usually, the bloom is rust colored. Spent many a year as a polymer chemist designing rubber formulations for automotive and industrial applications. I'm very familiar with this issue, it is not uncommon.
 

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The bleaching effect is actually caused by materials in the rubber blooming to the surface. Materials that cure the rubber, along with materials that are added to aid in oxidation and ozone resistance can bloom to the surface. The antioxidants and antiozonants are actually designed to migrate to the surface to create a barrier which protects the rubber components. The curative agents typically only bloom to the surface when their concentration is higher than the solubility point (poor formulation by the chemist). Heat can speed up the migration to the surface. Bottom line, there is nothing detrimental (with the exception of appearance) going on here. The same phenomenon can be seen in tire sidewalls. Usually, the bloom is rust colored. Spent many a year as a polymer chemist designing rubber formulations for automotive and industrial applications. I'm very familiar with this issue, it is not uncommon.
Appreciate the scientific response. Is there anything we can do, anything we can apply that mitigates the poor appearance?
 

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The bleaching effect is actually caused by materials in the rubber blooming to the surface. Materials that cure the rubber, along with materials that are added to aid in oxidation and ozone resistance can bloom to the surface. The antioxidants and antiozonants are actually designed to migrate to the surface to create a barrier which protects the rubber components. The curative agents typically only bloom to the surface when their concentration is higher than the solubility point (poor formulation by the chemist). Heat can speed up the migration to the surface. Bottom line, there is nothing detrimental (with the exception of appearance) going on here. The same phenomenon can be seen in tire sidewalls. Usually, the bloom is rust colored. Spent many a year as a polymer chemist designing rubber formulations for automotive and industrial applications. I'm very familiar with this issue, it is not uncommon.
Now THAT'S what you call an explanation!
 
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