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Discussion Starter #1
Not sure if this topic is already out but I want to get the opinions of Trackhawk Owners on this topic.

Would you rather only have a 1yr “2018” run of Trackhawks? Keeps them more limited.

Or would you like to see Jeep continue with them throughout the next few years.

My vote would be to have a very limited run and then discontinue them. It would be outstanding for the resale value years later. But will see what happens.
 

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Having a limited number would help with resale but would be a disadvantage to those who want to modify. Personally, it doesn’t matter to me. I’ve got one and that’s all that really matters 🤓
 

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Since it's a Jeep that would be tough for FCA to even consider. It's the top selling SUV, like ever... Lol.

Now if the limited production to a few thousand per year, that would be cool. It would help the values hold up over longer periods of time and would help keep it away from the all the soccer moms that want the most expensive Jeep offering because they'd all be snagged up. (No offense to any soccer moms reading this, if you're here on the this forum you're probably pretty cool)

I drive a Giulia Quadrifoglio for my daily, they made less than 900 for the US markets for 2017. I have only ever seen one other local to me. He's an Alfa nut so he has a couple classic Alfas as well as the Quadrifoglio. I see AMGs and ///M and S/RS Audis everywhere.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I would like it to be for one model year like they are doing for the Demon.
That would be very cool. I don’t mind even 2 years. I heard the CEO of Jeep mention no more than 2500 produced for 2018. And the same number for 2019. If they stop production after 2019 that’s not too bad to have only 5000 made. At least they should maintain a strong resale value when that time comes.
 

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That would be very cool. I don’t mind even 2 years. I heard the CEO of Jeep mention no more than 2500 produced for 2018. And the same number for 2019. If they stop production after 2019 that’s not too bad to have only 5000 made. At least they should maintain a strong resale value when that time comes.
I’d bet there were far more than 2500 made for 2018. There were about that many original allocations alone when it was first released. I’d bet there could be double that amount, possibly even more. There’s no way they made less Trackhawk’s than Demon’s, so c’mon, 2500 Trackhawk’s for 2018 is not a realistic figure.
 

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Little outdated but it still shows they are WELL over 2500 for the 2018 model.

Total builds - Global production totals as of 05/18/2018:

Total Built: 6,169

Total Built Canada: 664 (included in total built)
Total Built RHD Export: 242 (included in total built)
 

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Little outdated but it still shows they are WELL over 2500 for the 2018 model.

Total builds - Global production totals as of 05/18/2018:

Total Built: 6,169

Total Built Canada: 664 (included in total built)
Total Built RHD Export: 242 (included in total built)
So my guess was fairly accurate. Thanks for the info.
 

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The only thing that might concern me with extremely limited production is parts availability for those of us who keep our vehicles for awhile. I know the engines are mass-produced, but the driveline upgrades for the TH model are not. So a short production run might mean it is tough to repair/replace parts down the road to some critical components.

Doesn't surprise me at the 6100+ figure, and I bet they produce at least 5000 next year. The refresh in 2020 may mean a 1-2 year hiatus, but we'll see. That may be a completely different hi-po Jeep anyway, by that point.
 

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The only thing that might concern me with extremely limited production is parts availability for those of us who keep our vehicles for awhile. I know the engines are mass-produced, but the driveline upgrades for the TH model are not. So a short production run might mean it is tough to repair/replace parts down the road to some critical components.

Doesn't surprise me at the 6100+ figure, and I bet they produce at least 5000 next year. The refresh in 2020 may mean a 1-2 year hiatus, but we'll see. That may be a completely different hi-po Jeep anyway, by that point.
Wouldn’t this be a warranty fiasco for FCA if they warrant a product and then discontinue the parts for it well before the warranty periods have lapsed? I’d think it behooves them to keep these parts readily available for a while. Though I do agree with you that it could at the minimum take longer to get them than the parts that are mass produced.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Little outdated but it still shows they are WELL over 2500 for the 2018 model.

Total builds - Global production totals as of 05/18/2018:

Total Built: 6,169

Total Built Canada: 664 (included in total built)
Total Built RHD Export: 242 (included in total built)
So my guess was fairly accurate. Thanks for the info.
https://youtu.be/_dDfVovO9M8

I was going off a video in 2017. If you listen at about the 1:39 mark he talks about numbers produced.

I do agree that they made more but it would have been cool to keep the numbers fairly low.
 

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They probably should’ve built less Trackhawk’s and more Demon’s. FCA wouldn’t be losing out on all of the premium being paid for the Demon’s if they built a few more, and the Trackhawk’s wouldn’t be selling for under dealer invoice if they didn’t over produce these. Maybe a limited run of 5k each would’ve been far more profitable while still building the same numbers of total vehicles. I think they messed up by not making the Trackhawk limited to a specific number out of the gate, even if it was the projected number that they thought they could sell without a limit on them, since that ‘limited’ moniker would help sell them. Dealers wouldn’t be willing to simply break even to get these off of their lots. Just my two cents.
 

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Wouldn’t this be a warranty fiasco for FCA if they warrant a product and then discontinue the parts for it well before the warranty periods have lapsed? I’d think it behooves them to keep these parts readily available for a while. Though I do agree with you that it could at the minimum take longer to get them than the parts that are mass produced.
I specifically referenced (or thought I did) long-term ownership...which would be an "out of warranty" issue. You're exactly right about the next 4-5 years. No worries there! What about someone who wants/needs to buy parts 7-8+ years from now? I can't forecast with 100% certainty that I will keep this vehicle that long, but I've got a 16yr old Corvette I bought new back in '02 that still sits in my garage. :) And my concern is related to very specific beefed up driveline parts, designed for this specific application. Obviously interior/exterior pieces and electronics will be available for decades probably since they are cross-platform items, not specific to the TH.

FCA will certainly cover themselves on short-term warranty issues that may arise. I'm just speaking practically for someone who owns this vehicle 10yrs from now. Even then it is _not_ a requirement for FCA (or any auto manufacturer) to keep up with parts production... however, we know these companies do make money on new, off-the-shelf, parts for older cars, that are out of production.
 

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They probably should’ve built less Trackhawk’s and more Demon’s. FCA wouldn’t be losing out on all of the premium being paid for the Demon’s if they built a few more, and the Trackhawk’s wouldn’t be selling for under dealer invoice if they didn’t over produce these. Maybe a limited run of 5k each would’ve been far more profitable while still building the same numbers of total vehicles. I think they messed up by not making the Trackhawk limited to a specific number out of the gate, even if it was the projected number that they thought they could sell without a limit on them, since that ‘limited’ moniker would help sell them. Dealers wouldn’t be willing to simply break even to get these off of their lots. Just my two cents.
FCA makes the same amount on the TrackHawks either way. The more they build, the more money they make and the TrackHawk has a MUCH larger profit than any other Grand Cherokee.

Every one they have made is sold, at least to the dealer anyway. Now if the dealer over ordered and has to sell them low, that's on the dealer. It might effect 2019 sales if the dealers are a little more reluctant to order so many though.

Not saying FCA couldn't have kept it as a halo model as they did the Demon as a marketing tactic, no idea if that would have been a good idea or bad idea long term. Obviously would have been good for the buyers who obtained them as said above, it would help re-sell, but short term, they saw lots of $$$$s so they went for it.

Personally, if they had limited it to 5000 or less, I wouldn't have one. I wasn't ready to purchase at that time. I also doubt I would have waited for 2019 model year either, I would have likely spent my money elsewhere. So for myself, I am very glad they were NOT limited as I know I am happier with the TH than I would have been with other options, but I do think my money would have went to a competitor had I not been able to order one when I did.
 

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I specifically referenced (or thought I did) long-term ownership...which would be an "out of warranty" issue. You're exactly right about the next 4-5 years. No worries there! What about someone who wants/needs to buy parts 7-8+ years from now? I can't forecast with 100% certainty that I will keep this vehicle that long, but I've got a 16yr old Corvette I bought new back in '02 that still sits in my garage. :) And my concern is related to very specific beefed up driveline parts, designed for this specific application. Obviously interior/exterior pieces and electronics will be available for decades probably since they are cross-platform items, not specific to the TH.

FCA will certainly cover themselves on short-term warranty issues that may arise. I'm just speaking practically for someone who owns this vehicle 10yrs from now. Even then it is _not_ a requirement for FCA (or any auto manufacturer) to keep up with parts production... however, we know these companies do make money on new, off-the-shelf, parts for older cars, that are out of production.
Out of warranty would be 8 plus years since they sell 8 year extended warranties. We’ll probably all have moved on to the next best thing by then. They probably don’t need to keep these parts available beyond that 8 year time limit, though they probably will if I were to guess. I really doubt parts for these will be unavailable or very difficult to get in 4-5 years.
 

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Out of warranty would be 8 plus years since they sell 8 year extended warranties. We’ll probably all have moved on to the next best thing by then. They probably don’t need to keep these parts available beyond that 8 year time limit, though they probably will if I were to guess. I really doubt parts for these will be unavailable or very difficult to get in 4-5 years.
Parts that were specific to the 2008 Magnum SRT or my SRT6 crossfire were hard to get just 2-3 years after production. Thankfully on either of those the mechanical bits were shared with other vehicles.

It really just depends on how well the bean counters do at estimating failures and who supplies the parts. For many parts, the manufacturer will make a final purchase of the part when production ends. They will estimate how many they will need based on expected failure rates, part cost, part size (how much warehouse space will it take up) and number of vehicles produced.

Often, especially for low volume products, they round down, simply figuring that having to buy back a couple might be less costly than over ordering and the parts sitting on shelves.

But yes it goes both ways, I have bought OEM parts for insanely cheap, many years after a product left the assembly line because the manufacturer OVER ordered, but I have also personally seen it go the other direction as well.
 

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Parts that were specific to the 2008 Magnum SRT or my SRT6 crossfire were hard to get just 2-3 years after production. Thankfully on either of those the mechanical bits were shared with other vehicles.

It really just depends on how well the bean counters do at estimating failures and who supplies the parts. For many parts, the manufacturer will make a final purchase of the part when production ends. They will estimate how many they will need based on expected failure rates, part cost, part size (how much warehouse space will it take up) and number of vehicles produced.

Often, especially for low volume products, they round down, simply figuring that having to buy back a couple might be less costly than over ordering and the parts sitting on shelves.

But yes it goes both ways, I have bought OEM parts for insanely cheap, many years after a product left the assembly line because the manufacturer OVER ordered, but I have also personally seen it go the other direction as well.
I hear ya. I had 1992 GMC Typhoon, which was a very limited two year model production run, which the Trackhawk may be following in its footsteps. And I needed a replacement motor for it in 1993, when it was even still being produced, and yet it was a very long wait. Stupid me, I chipped it and blew the motor. Which is probably why I own an 8 year warranty on my Trackhawk and it’s BONE stock. 😬 Anyways, I was without my Typhoon for about 3 months waiting for a motor for it. So I understand your point, hopefully parts for this SUV will be better managed.
 

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I had 1992 GMC Typhoon....
Awesome! That was my dream truck for years, well that and its brother the Syclone, could never make up my mind which I wanted more...
 

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Out of warranty would be 8 plus years since they sell 8 year extended warranties. We’ll probably all have moved on to the next best thing by then. They probably don’t need to keep these parts available beyond that 8 year time limit, though they probably will if I were to guess. I really doubt parts for these will be unavailable or very difficult to get in 4-5 years.
Let's hope so, but I have serious doubts that they will be keeping/producing the upgraded driveline parts (billet shafts, upgraded trans, etc) for something they produce ~10,000 units for. Engines/engine components... not worried about that... they built how many Hellcat-powered vehicles? That will be in large supply for awhile.

Hopefully none of this is needed, of course. :)
 
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